Episode 10

full
Published on:

7th May 2023

Jeff Bell - Oncology Specialist from a Natural Perspective - What to do if You're an Oncology Patient

Jeff Bell has been interested in and dedicated to health and wellness since

early childhood. Originally, he planned to follow in his father’s footsteps

and become a conventional physician. Early in his studies, he realized that

he was meant to specialize in oncology and do something about the terrible

loss and suffering that cancer was causing.

Jeff had his premeds finished by the time he left high school. A short way

into medical school, he realized it was not his path to restrict his work to

allopathic, or mainstream medicine. Instead, he returned to his earlier

roots in alternative, indigenous, natural and holistic medicine.

For the last 44 years, Jeff’s primary focus has been on helping adults

diagnosed with cancer to overcome it without chemotherapy or radiation.

When it comes to cancer, Jeff’s clients enjoy some of the highest success

rates and best outcomes in this world.


In the course of his decades dedicated to this mission, he has learned

about, developed and taught leading edge methods for disease prevention,

and overall wellness.


In his own words:


“I help adults diagnosed with cancer to overcome it and recover their full health without chemotherapy or radiation.


They feel overwhelmed, are bombarded with conflicting advice and are not sure what to do.  Instead, I guide them from fear and chaos to clarity and calm.


We use my proven system, based on more than 44 years of successful experience, to eliminate the cancer and guide them back to own full health.”

_____________________________________


Here are 2 important blog posts that will help people to take the initial steps to align their emotional or "inner game" with healing from cancer and returning to health.


https://myhealthoptimizer.com/diagnosis-shock-you-need-to-know-this-to-overcome-cancer/


https://myhealthoptimizer.com/cancer-from-fear-and-chaos-to-calmness-and-clarity-step-1/


The best way to get in touch with meJeff and find out how he may be able to help is to call or e-mail:


(541) 942-6953


jeff@MyHealthOptimizer.com 


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Transcript

Hi and welcome to The You World Showcase program. Today we're talking with Jeff Bell who.

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Has been interested in and dedicated to health and Wellness since early childhood. Originally, he planned to follow in his father's footsteps and become a conventional physician.

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But early in his studies, he realized that he was meant to specialize in oncology and do something about the terrible loss and suffering that cancer was causing.

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Jeff had his pre meds finished by high school and a short way into medical school.

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He realized it was not his path to restrict his work to allopathic or mainstream medicine.

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Instead, he returned to his earlier roots in alternative indigenous, natural and holistic medicine for the last 40-4 years, Jeff's primary focus has been on helping.

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Adults diagnosed with cancer to overcome it without chemotherapy or radiation.

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When it comes to cancer, Jeffs clients enjoy some of the highest success rates and best outcomes in the world.

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In the course.

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Of his decades dedicated to this mission, he has learned about and developed and taught leading edge methods for disease prevention and overall Wellness.

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Please help me give a warm welcome to Jeff Bell.

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Welcome Jeff Bell.

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we've had a little bit of a conversation before we got started here.

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So just kind of.

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Let everybody know.

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Where you're at, who you are, what you do.

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OK.

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Get into the deep stuff.

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Alright, fantastic. Thank you very much for inviting me to be here. I'm thrilled at what you're doing. I'm thrilled to be able to participate and contribute in whatever way I can. And so I have spent the last 44 plus years of my life filling the mission.

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Which I honestly from my heart believe is why creator put me here in this world.

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And against a few pretty big challenges has kept me here and that is I help adults who've been diagnosed with cancer to overcome it without chemotherapy, without radiation, in most of the time without surgery, and to not only get rid of the cancer.

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But to fix the core causes that allowed the cancer to thrive in their being in the 1st place, and to fix all of that, so that ultimately they get their health back, live out their full life, as you know, whatever that looks like.

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And basically kind of a glib way of saying it is put cancer in their rear view mirror forever.

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That is pretty phenomenal.

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I it's a.

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It's a huge calling.

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And how did?

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You get started.

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Why did you decide to go the holistic route versus the allopathic route well.

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Yeah, I actually made that choice in terms of what I was going to do pretty early in life.

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So my dad went through medical school, graduated top honors, and my brilliant uncle, Uncle Murray, who was probably the most brilliant human being I've ever actually had anything to do with.

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And I've.

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Hung out and shared research with Nobel laureates and this guy was smarter.

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It just blows.

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my mind, and he one day when I was about three years old, I was whining and throwing a little tantrum because I couldn't figure out how to read books and I saw the people our house was filled with books, and I saw grown-ups reading these books and they just seemed in France.

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I felt frustrated.

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Rated so I was throwing a little bit of a tantrum.

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My Uncle Marie happened to be over.

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He lived nearby and he said what's wrong?

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And I said, well, these things called books.

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I can't figure it out.

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And I wanna know what's in them.

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Said Ohh, let's fix that. He took me into my dad's office because he was over at our house. Spent 30 minutes with me and.

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So when I walked out, I could read medical textbooks at 3.

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And I believe most kids could do that if the adults around them didn't shut it down and discourage them.

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So I never went through the see dick, run see, Jane...

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Whatever, pet the cat or something.

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The hell with.

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That it was kind of.

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I think a lot of that is just to give teachers in, you know, elementary school, something to do to entertain themselves, to keep the kids locked down from kindergarten through.

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12th grade or whatever. Just.

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Yeah, you're absolutely right.

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Don't get me started because we'll go way off on a tangent about my criticisms of the so-called conventional educational system.

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It doesn't work. It's broken.

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It it's been broken for a long, long time and one of my mentors, when it comes to education cause I've spent time teaching a little bit too, which I love doing.

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It's my second favorite thing to do behind the healing work and close a close second.

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Is Daniel Quinn.

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Daniel Quinn has essays about what's wrong with the educational system, and man, does he nail it?

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Wow, so I don't want to get off on that cause. Well anyway, so I was three years old and I decided I was gonna follow in my dad's footsteps and become a physician.

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And at that time, I didn't even know about the dichotomy between allopathic and natural or alternative medicine.

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I didn't know anything about it, so I just started reading and studying.

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He had a collection of about:

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They rent them from the college bookstore, which I think is a travesty cause if you're making slides of human tissue, you learn things that you don't learn any other way.

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All right.

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Or most other way?

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To the shortcutting of the important parts.

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Of the process because everything is a process.

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Learning is a process you're not taught anything.

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You learn, things you assimilate information from other people that are put there in your path.

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Right.

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To shares things with you.

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And and from life experience and the most important thing is you learn things from asking good questions and then being open to see where those.

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Need instead of being shoved some, you know, having some dogma shoved down your throat anyway, so I'm on this path and I'm studying, I'm reading everything I can get my hands on.

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I'm studying my dad's slides and being careful and fortunately not breaking any of them or anything, and there my dad was super precision.

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Overachiever, so they're beautifully organized with this fantastic little card file.

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So you could find them.

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So if you wanted to see what, you know, a certain slice of a pineal gland looked like you, could you could find it.

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And likely it was there.

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OK, so I'm.

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Like, I don't think I ever remember a minute of my life being bored from the time I.

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Started that process.

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It anyway, Fast forward a couple of years and beginning of summer, and my beloved Grandpa Jack, who stood about 6-3, weighed about 2:40 but fit as could be, could easily in his mid 70s, could have run a 10K if he'd.

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Wanted to and.

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I loved him cause he took me fishing, took me, taught me how to use snowshoes and stuff, you know?

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I mean, it was fantastic.

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Beginning of the summer, he gets sick.

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He's diagnosed with cancer and at the end of the summer he's less than £100 and then we're attending his funeral.

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And to say I was devastated, man, I'm getting choked up just thinking about it.

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It was so traumatic for me and so sad and just horrible.

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So on the way back from the funeral, I'm riding in the car with my dad and I said, dad, you know, what happened to Grandpa Jack?

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I don't understand this.

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It doesn't make any sense.

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And Dad says, well, you know, it was too bad that cancer was very aggressive and couldn't be controlled.

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And I say, wait a minute.

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That doesn't make sense.

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Are you sure it wasn't the treatment that killed him?

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And Dad gets this funny look on his face and says, man, you're pretty smart for a 5 year old kid.

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I think you're right.

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And that's where I made the decision.

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And that.

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Allopathic oncology, at least I don't know about the I I didn't know about the rest of the medicine, although I have my criticisms of that too.

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But allopathic oncology was for the birds actually I like birds not for the birds.

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I don't know who it's for.

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It's not for human beings that you care about.

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It's going to be it; I call it the medical industrial complex.

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I call it the cancer industrial complex with that, but the rest of it's the medical industrial complex and.

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Everything is profit and control 1st and I'm not criticizing most of the practitioners I've met wonderful people along the lines I've collaborated with conventional practitioners in all different fields, and they're wonderful human beings.

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They're dedicated as part of my training.

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I spent.

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Four years working at least part time, but a lot of hours in one of the busiest trauma centers in the country.

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You know, studying emergency medicine, which I boy, did I learn a lot?

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You know, and those lessons are still serving me.

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So I'm not.

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I'm not disparaging the dedicated people who.

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Who want to do the right thing?

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I'm saying that the system.

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And the relatively small group of people who are profit and control driven, starting with the Rockefeller family, since we might as well name some names, have distorted the thing so bad that if you're a practitioner with integrity and heart.

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You're up against so many obstacles that it's almost impossible to do the right thing.

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Anyway, so I said.

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I am not going to become a conventional physician.

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I'm going to become an oncologist and I'm going to make things possible for people.

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I'm going to find better solutions and make things possible for people that are different than what my grandpa Jack and the rest of the family experienced.

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And that's what my life is about. And I've never really wavered from that. So by the time I finished high school, I had my pre meds done and I was excited and on fire to go to I I was actually looking at 22 schools USC and UCLA right near each other.

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Southern California and the LA area, and they were both kind of vying for me, full scholarship from either one because they didn't have too many people who had their pre meds done before they left high school and they thought I was probably a good bet.

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Right.

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Well, I wasn't a good bet.

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And here's why.

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I don't blindly listen to authority.

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Well, never have, and most of the trouble I've gotten in my life is because I don't.

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Put up with that, and so about six months into it, I'm sitting in this lecture hall with about 81st year Med students and this professor of hematology, you know, blood chemistry and all that stuff, blood diseases and everything, who I have to say was.

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Just not suited to be a teacher.

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Arrogant as hell.

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I think he had had his curiosity gland surgically excised, so it just was nonexistent.

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He made a statement, and I wish I could remember what it was, but it was something about some aspect of blood chemistry.

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And 5 minutes later, he made a statement that was clearly in contradiction.

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And so I, being respectful, not wanting to, you know, be disrespectful at that point.

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Now I'm happy to be disrespectful.

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Yeah, it just doesn't matter anymore.

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It doesn't. Well, I'm 72 years old, so I've earned the right to be disrespectful, but I was trying to, you know, I was 17 or something like that, I guess. And I was trying to be respectful. I. Excuse me, professor.

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It sounds I think I'm confused and I need some help here.

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You know, it sounds like about 5 minutes ago you said this.

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Now you said this and I don't see how the two can both be true.

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Can you please help me out here?

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I'm feeling kind of lost.

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He gets red in the face.

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He stares at me, glares at me and he says it's not on the test.

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So I'm not going to waste our time.

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Uh, discussing.

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And so I said, excuse me and at that point I got mad and disrespect. Like I said, excuse me, we are being trained to be the custodians of people's most precious possession, their lives.

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And because something's not on some silly test, you're not going to explain it.

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And he said, sit down and shut up.

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And I said I've got a better idea.

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I stood up and I roared F you and said I'm leaving this crap pile.

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I don't have any more use for it.

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There's nothing here for me and I walked out and five people disenrolled with me that day.

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It's interesting to me that.

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Teachers and we're going to go back to this a little bit.

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Are under the impression that somehow you work for them when in in reality you've hired them to give you some information that they possess that you wish to possess, so it's totally within a student's rights as the employer.

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Right.

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Right.

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To demand excellence and clarification, and I taught that to my kids when they.

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Beautifully said.

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My kids went to an alternative school to get their diplomas.

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Their high school diplomas.

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They went in when they were 13 and they all graduated at 16.

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Yeah, just to get this stupid piece of paper. And I told them all. You know, you're going to get A's because I can get you seeds at home and I can make up the little paper myself.

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But you all want to go and do this and have this experience.

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So when you're talking to these teachers.

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It's a game they're there to provide you with information.

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It's your job to suck that information out of them.

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Yeah. And honestly.

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And I've done this many, many times in my life.

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If I wanted to learn something, I found somebody who had two characteristics.

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One, they clearly knew what they were talking about and they knew it from experience, and they were willing and had the skills to help me.

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Learn it.

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OK.

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And I would go find someone.

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So if I wanted to learn how to do a certain kind of woodworking, I paid my way through school part of the time repairing old wooden sailboats.

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So I had to learn some woodworking skills that were pretty advanced. I found people who had been doing it for 30-40 years and I hired them.

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To mentor me, I don't even want to call it teach cause it's not even the information, it's the processes that you need to learn the mindset.

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You need what questions you want to ask.

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As you see some new set of conditions how to find more information when you need it and how to remove your own barriers to learning so that you can let the information and let the experience inform you.

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And so it's a whole thing if I had anything at all to do with middle schools in this country, I would make the first semester focused on the skills you need in order to learn and in order to discover and explore effectively.

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And once people learn that, then the rest of it would be pretty easy.

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Yeah, you know, they don't do it.

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Yeah, you really don't need schools.

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What you need is mentors.

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Yeah, and.

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Yeah, I agree.

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And it's really interesting that you mentioned that the teachers are under the illusion that they that you work for them if you're the student and that there's this hierarchy in everything.

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The same thing as what you find in, in, in, in the medical industrial complex because.

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Is, you know, we have phrases like doctors orders.

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I'm following doctor's orders.

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Well, that's BS.

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The doctor is there as an expert.

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Hopefully and a skilled resource mentor person to help me in an area where I may not have the information and skills.

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I need or where maybe I just want a second point of view on something so that I can.

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Better assess whether my own plan makes sense or not.

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And and of course, ideally, if doctors were doing what they're supposed to do and and what the original intention was, if you go back to the ancient Greeks who had it right in that area, they would be continuing to learn first, do no harm informed consent and always learning.

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First, do no harm.

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So those 3 principles.

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And that's not the way it is.

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So the doctors think that they are in charge of you and you know it.

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It's it's the whole system.

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I mean, from my point of view, even though there is some good in the system, you pretty much gotta dismantle it and start over.

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Cause I I don't think it can be redeemed in its current state.

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And that's where The You.

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World order comes in. It's.

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This people working one-on-one small, local, sustainable and not.

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Not the somebody has to be in charge of you and tell you what to do.

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Mentality be in charge of yourself.

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Take responsibility for your own decisions and your own actions and you know, connect with other real human beings that might have something that they.

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Can share with you.

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And that's so well said and such an important point, and I think it carries over to all aspects of life.

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So I was just in a in a workshop put out last night where we were dealing with this.

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Project and it was put on by Heart Quest Ministries, which I believe is a wonderful organization.

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They do just fabulous like personal development, inner game kind of work.

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So anyway, so the title of the workshop was from victim to Victor and the idea is.

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If you own your own decisions, take responsibility for them.

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It's pretty hard to live as a victim and you end up living as a victor regardless of whether you like the outcome of your decisions or not.

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If you don't like the outcome, then you find an opportunity to do it a different way the next time.

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Plot twist.

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Yeah, figure it out.

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Absolutely, yeah, yeah.

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It's just a new quest.

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Yeah, yeah.

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Plot twist.

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Twist is a good word for that.

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That's good.

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Would it be helpful to know the number one secret to dealing with?

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OK, so I was reading all these medical text books and stuff from the time I was 3 and I got into the cancer books from the time I was five I would pedal my little bicycle with the book basket on the front to the local library, which fortunately was a major branch and had a really good medical.

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Textbook section.

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I would take out these thick medical textbooks, pretty sure that the librarian thought I was using them to post a prop up a broken bedpost, but I was actually reading them and study.

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In them, everything I read about cancer was filled with contradictions.

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None of it made sense, and my frustration level was building like a pool of lava.

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I was just livid about it cause I could tell that I wasn't being played straight with, not at all.

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And and that even these textbooks.

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Which supposedly have been peer reviewed and edited till the cows come home were full of bunk.

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Because you know again the same thing you'd be given this piece of information.

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You'd look at this piece of information, they'd tell you both are true and they're mutually exclusive.

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So I was just, yeah, I was just.

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Yeah, things that are different are not the same.

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I was beside myself with it until.

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And I'll never forget this right around the time I turned 13, I'm sitting at the kitchen table.

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In our little house and I got ahold of the translated works of Doctor Otto Warburg.

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Do you know who he was?

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No, I don't.

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ian. Brilliant, brilliant. In:

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Now this is important.

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This is the single biggest key to cancer, period.

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Everything else is down in priority below this well below.

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The metabolic OK first, the conventional model, which is where all the research money to this day still is being allocated like 99.999% of every dollar that goes into cancer recent.

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Because it generates a profit.

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Yeah, is into something called the somatic model of cancer.

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The somatic model of cancer says.

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Something goes wrong with the genes, or they're screwed up to begin with, and then cells begin misbehaving and it creates cancer.

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And first of all, that's simplistic, but secondly, it's wrong.

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It's absolutely wrong with a few isolated exceptions.

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If somebody who's working in a lab that handles.

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Radioactive materials and they have an accident.

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2 weeks later the person has leukemia.

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OK, that's genetic damage.

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The radiation damages the genome and.

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But that's still toxicity.

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You're off to the.

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Well, right, but it, but it is genetic damage that's ultimately the catalyst, at least to get the ball rolling there.

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OK.

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But that's not most cancers.

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Most cancers work this way.

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Do you remember from high school biology something called the Krebs Cycle?

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OK, so the Krebs cycle also known as the citric acid Cycle or the vitamin C cycle because it uses a ton of vitamin C, is this beautiful, elegant process that happens inside the little energy generators, the mitochondria in the cells?

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And it's very efficient, it generates a ton of energy, very little waste and basically it can handle a wide variety of fuels.

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It can metabolize a wide variety of fuels.

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So it it can, it can metabolize proteins.

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Every amino acid known.

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To be in the human body many carbohydrates, all sugars and almost all fats and oils.

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That's a wide variety of fuels, and it does it very efficiently.

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So there's almost no waste after product post metabolic product.

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Cells function beautifully.

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Now a cell gets under metabolic distress and this is all what Warburg won the Nobel Prize in medicine for a cell gets under distress, and it can no longer use that Krebs cycle it, and so just to survive, it reverts to a much more primitive process.

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That's not efficient and it has very limited fuel selection called glycolysis, which is a form of fermentation and it.

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It's horribly inefficient. It's about 116th as efficient and generates massive amounts of waste. So what happens then? The waste that's generated overwhelms the detox pathways at the cellular level, and now you've got a toxic environment inside the cell, that toxic environment.

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Does three things that are very significant.

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It does damage the genes it does, but the gene damage is the effect of the of those conditions, not the.

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Because of them and it also damages apoptosis, which is natural pre programmed cell death.

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So the cells that are supposed to live six or seven days like the cells that line your colon for example.

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That's a high friction area, so you want those replaced because they wear out just from the friction of material passing through.

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And so those get replaced every six to seven days.

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Well, if apoptosis gets shut off because the .

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Cell is under metabolic distress.

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Now those cells can live on for a year or two.

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Well, they're going to misbehave cause they're all of their regulatory circuit circuitry wears out.

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It also shuts down the regulatory, the biological regulatory mechanisms that tell the cell how frequently.

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To divide and replicate.

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So now we have cells that live that are immortal, which most cells are not supposed to be, and we have cells that.

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Grow out of control.

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Does that sound a little bit like cancer?

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That sounds just like cancer.

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All right, now and by the way, the mitochondria are the organelles that not only metabolize fuels and create energy, they also control apoptosis and cell division.

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So it makes sense that if they're under distress, all three of those functions are going to go off the rails.

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Right.

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So the ramification of this is glycolysis can't process proteins, can't process fats or oils, can't process some carbohydrates, although you want to be careful.

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Right.

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The main fuels that and can't process almost all amino acids to generate energy. So basically what you're now down to is you're down to sugar, which is cancer's main fuel. You're down to 1 amino acid called glutamine, and we use ancient.

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Higher Vedic herbs to block the glutamine, use ashwaganda to do that.

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I love ashwaganda.

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It's a miracle drug in my world.

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It is. It is.

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Anyway, you block the glutamine and the third fuel is the by the biochemical byproducts of inflammation.

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So you drop the inflammation level, which by the way, is why you don't want to do biopsies.

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Biopsies generate inflammation right at the site of a suspected cancer.

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It's like pouring gasoline on a fire.

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Right.

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You also don't want to consume sugar, you want to keep that as low as you can and unfortunately, contrary to popular mythology, it's sugar in almost any form.

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You can eat a small amount of fruit sugar as long as it's.

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In foods in such way that it metabolizes and assimilates slowly.

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So if people want a little bit of fruit, they're dealing with cancer, raspberries, blackberries, things like that, organic strawberries.

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Basically the keto diet.

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Yeah, you pretty much want to be on a ketogenic diet so that your metabolism is actually depending on on combining ketone bodies with oxygen rather than sugars.

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Now you're not feeding the cancer.

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OK, so that's very important.

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Here's the proof that the metabolic model is accurate and the somatic model, which is the genome model, is not.

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Ohh I need to add 1 more piece before I go there so if you look into a cancer cell you will find genetic damage but that's genetic damage that's caused by the overload of toxicity in the cell.

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And because of that the gene, the genes that are damaged are all over the map.

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So here's the proof.

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2-2 pieces of proof first of.

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Humanity has spent well over several trillions of dollars in 80 years trying to make real progress in overcoming and or preventing cancer, and the progress is crappy, so it's disappointing at best.

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I I'd say it's unacceptable.

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It's terrible.

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Overall survival rates, if you average them out might have increased by about 3% / 80 years. That's not very good considering the amount of effort that went into it and the reason for that is.

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All that money and research goes into the somatic model, but the model's wrong if the model were right, we should have made 50% improvement.

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60-70 who knows? I mean, we should have made massive improvement. We haven't. And these are really smart people doing it. But the problem is they're looking in the wrong place.

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Go back to the metabolic model.

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If we were to take a cancer tumor, let's say a breast cancer tumor, about the size of a Robins egg, it's got a few billion cells in it.

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I didn't have time to count them all, so I don't know.

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Exactly how many?

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ls. Now let's randomly sample:

::

Make it as random as we can, and let's take those cells and use our nice advanced technology and we'll subject them to genetic assay and identify what genetic damage.

::

Or, you know, mutations and problems exist within those cells.

::

We will find them in almost every one of those cells, maybe even every one of them.

::

But guess what? The genetic damage is all over the map. So in sample one we'll find Gene G21 and B16 damaged in the next one.

::

It's a six and you know Q and I'm just making up names.

::

It doesn't matter.

::

Yeah, it just it's random.

::

Totally random.

::

And if the genetic damage were the cause of the cancer rather than the effect, we should have a high level of congruence and that exact experiment that I just described has been.

::

And hundreds of times in the last 30 years or so, and it consistently shows us that that damage is just as random as the sample selection.

::

So we can cross off genetic gammas.

::

We keep doing the same thing and expecting different results.

::

Yeah, I think that's the definition of insanity.

::

Pretty much what you're saying.

::

Only in this case it's not insanity, it's the problem is that the real agenda, which is well hidden, is not isn't doesn't deliver the results that we want.

::

It delivers the results that Big Pharma wants.

::

And here, here's an interesting other little experiment.

::

I'm and, and I'm probably talking too much.

::

You should tell me to.

::

You are fine.

::

OK, I don't.

::

The really interesting John.

::

I don't want to totally dominate everything, but the deal is that.

::

I think about 15 years ago some, uh, some medical statisticians from Stanford University.

::

So these are people within their skill set world class Exp.

::

Did a survey of about:

::

They said if you or a family member were diagnosed with a potentially life threatening cancer, would you use radiation and or chemotherapy?

::

Guess how many of them said no.

::

Probably a large percentage of them because they know the truth.

::

Yeah, 73%.

::

Now, if I had designed that survey, I would have been a little more in your face.

::

I would have asked that first question.

::

It's brilliant.

::

There's no way to improve that question.

::

The second question would have been and do you still prescribe and recommend chemotherapy and radiation to your patients if they say yes to that, say, how do you reconcile that?

::

How do you sleep at night?

::

Well, the bottom line is that they are just employees of a medical complex.

::

Told what to.

::

Do and what to think and what to prescribe and you know, the last two years have made that crystal clear.

::

They have.

::

There were and anybody that tried to speak out against it was castigated and.

::

Yeah, so here's a beautiful example of that.

::

Do you know who Cameron?

::

Kyle Cameron Sydell.

::

Or it might be Cameron Kyle Siddell.

::

No, it's Kyle Cameron Sydell.

::

OK.

::

I was involved in frontline research as soon as the COVID thing happened.

::

And the reason for that is I am part of a worldwide research network. There's about 100 of us who do our best to stay under the radar.

::

But we collaborate and we freely share information.

::

We don't charge each other and you know, we don't hold on to what we know we share.

::

Right.

::

So it's a so I can I can reach out to somebody in Egypt and say, hey, I'm seeing this weird lung thing.

::

What do you know about that?

::

And I happen to know he's a pulmonary expert.

::

He's gonna tell me exactly what the leading edge information is on that and he'll give me as much information as I need.

::

rrangement. So in November of:

::

Independently 2 separate.

::

Researchers, actually one of them was an emergency room physician.

::

The other one was a peer researcher from Wuhan, China.

::

Reach out to me and they say, man, you need to see this.

::

There's something really weird going on.

::

We don't have the answers yet, but something's funky here and.

::

And you need to know about it.

::

So I was probably one of the first people in the United States.

::

Other than the people who orchestrated it, of course, to know about COVID and what was going on anyway so.

::

One of the things that happened early on in COVID, they were using ventilators with people to supposedly save lives now.

::

Maybe justifiable, maybe beneficial strategy if you do it right.

::

Cameron Kyle Siddell was an an emergency physician in one of the Big ER's in back in New York City.

::

And he noticed something.

::

He noticed people were dying like flies from the ventilators.

::

And he looked at autopsies and saw that literally hope you're not squeamish.

::

Literally their lungs were being blown apart from the.

::

Inside and what he realized was that they were setting the ventilator pressure too high.

::

They were setting it the way you would for treating bacterial pneumonia, which is a pretty high pressure setting.

::

Instead, he realized cause he had experience with emergency mountain medicine, so he knew about high altitude tickets, he said.

::

Wait a minute.

::

This virus or whatever it is, has damaged the structural integrity of the lungs.

::

If you use that pressure, you're killing people.

::

Well, turn the pressure down to what you would do for someone with high altitude sickness, which is basically one of the primary ways that pulmonary edema shows up and in pulmonary edema, you have to be very careful.

::

If you ventilate someone cause the lungs are have become flimsy.

::

So he does that, he posts a video on it on maybe YouTube or something.

::

I don't remember.

::

He sends me a copy of it, so I start sharing it all over the place.

::

Next thing you know, he's being castigated.

::

And next thing you know, he's lost his job.

::

Just for trying to help people look at something a little differently.

::

I know.

::

Not saying that you know all of this stuff is just like fuel for people that may have been on the fringe before that.

::

It's like you're just proving them right.

::

Yeah, yeah, absolutely. So anyway.

::

What's the one thing you want people to?

::

Take away from this conversation today.

::

I want them to take two things away.

::

I can't narrow it to 1 the 1st.

::

That was great.

::

Thing, the first thing to take away from this conversation is if you have a diagnosis of cancer, or even if you're high risk of cancer.

::

Get rid of the sugar.

::

Clean up your diet to the best of your ability, and that's complicated because there's different metabolic.

::

Types and that gets into.

::

You know that requires a rather rare and hard to find level of expertise.

::

Most nutritionists won't know it, but at least drop your sugar level.

::

You might become skilled at testing your blood glucose, which is pretty easy to do.

::

People who have type 2 diabetes or type 1 even.

::

Do it all the time, by the way, because I play guitar, I don't like having holes in my fingers, but I do like to keep track of my blood sugar, so I do it here on the upper part of my.

::

Upper arm and the way I do it is I bang on it a little to bring the the blood to the surface like that and then you push the little lamp Lancer thing down so that you get a little bubble of skin pushing up.

::

Under deal.

::

You can see it'll turn bright red.

::

It's had blood.

::

Then you trigger it.

::

You get a nice little.

::

Drop of blood to process with your glucose monitoring kit and you don't have any damage to your hands.

::

What do you think?

::

Is the the optimal glucose level?

::

It depends on the person.

::

It depends how active they are, whether they have a lot of extra adipose tissue, otherwise known as fat, whether they're kind of lean and it depends on a lot of other factors.

::

But I I would say this when I was learning about this stuff and using my.

::

The body is my research lab.

::

What I was doing was I was keeping a log.

::

I would roughly keep the foods I was eating the amount, and I would I would test.

::

My blood sugar about 1/2 an hour after I awakened. You don't want to do it when you first wake up.

::

Cause when you first wake up, your body's jacking your blood sugar up to get you ready and give you energy so you can transfer from sleep state to wake state about 1/2 an hour later and that's known as the sunrise phenomenon. That little.

::

Spike. So about 1/2 an hour later you get your baseline before you eat any.

::

The food and then an hour and a half after you eat, you check the blood sugar and again cause you're doing it here and it's not very sensitive.

::

Don't worry about being a pin cushion.

::

No big thing, alright?

::

And I usually liked it if my blood sugar after eating.

::

A good full meal was 105 or less.

::

If it was over 105, I didn't like it. If I had an active cancer, I might drive it even a little further.

::

The second part of that is you can get a ketone meter.

::

Keto Mojo actually makes a pretty good combination meter.

::

Yeah. Yeah, they do.

::

I I have a couple of them in my little office and lab here and.

::

Although I wish they didn't have Wi-Fi built in, so you can't turn it off.

::

But basically I keep my ketone meters way away from me, so I'm not exposing myself.

::

I've recommended a couple of times that they make it so you can turn it off and for whatever reason too much to get into now.

::

They won't do it, which is too bad.

::

But anyway, I keep like I you want to get your ketones up.

::

So what's called the glucose ketone index or G Ki?

::

You want it at 2 or above?

::

And if you do that, you're depriving cancer of most of its fuel.

::

If you avoid inflammation and work, you can use really advanced forms of turmeric is a good thing.

::

I I use a lot of that in my work, but it has to be in a special formulation or it doesn't absorb well but.

::

If and don't do it with black pepper, there are problems with that.

::

Everyone recommends that's a mistake that leads to leaky gut over time, which you don't want so anyway.

::

Get your ketone level up two or better your glucose ketone index and then get your inflammation down.

::

Use some ashwaganda to block the glutamine and most cancers.

::

If you do those three things, they're at least going to stop growing.

::

Now, silver bullets are not the way to cure cancer or even heal from cancer.

::

They work great in Hollywood movies for killing werewolves, but they're not good when it comes to health, so you usually need a synergistic program of a lot of different.

::

So some of my daily checklists will have 30-40 items on them and each one has its little role that it fulfills.

::

So that's the first thing that I would recommend.

::

The second thing I would recommend is if you suspect you have a cancer.

::

In most cases do not do a biopsy.

::

And the reason for that is cancers will take off and spread following a biopsy, more times than not, which is why if you get a biopsy, even if it's early stage cancer, they will usually rush you into treatment cause they know it's gonna take off like wildfire.

::

The reason for that is when your body.

::

Text that it's got an overabundance of cancer cells in that have coalesced in an area.

::

It builds A membrane around it to try and contain it.

::

You go poking needles or scalpels through there, you're destroying the integrity of that membrane.

::

The second reason is biopsies cause inflammation.

::

What's a feel for cancer?

::

So you might as well pour gasoline on a fire while you're at it, so.

::

There are better ways to find things out, and plus biopsies usually are really unpleasant experiences, and I believe that when you deliberately, knowingly and willfully submit yourself to something that's gonna cause a lot of pain and be very uncomfortable, you're sending a message to your subconscious mind that you're not really important.

::

And you're not worth defending.

::

So then your immune system doesn't do its job.

::

So yeah.

::

How can people?

::

What do you help people with?

::

Let's, let's ask that question and then how can they get in touch with you?

::

Right.

::

So the first thing I do with somebody who reaches out to me cause they've been diagnosed with cancer and I also have something else.

::

I'm also working on relaunching a program I ran for years.

::

It was a group program, very affordable, but really detailed called cancer prevention.

::

And the idea is the best way to overcome cancer is don't get it.

::

Ohh that's awesome.

::

And if you ask the oncologists how to prevent cancer, they'll say nobody knows.

::

Well, that's not true.

::

You know, we do know there's plenty of information out there. Doesn't mean you have 100% guarantee, but you can certainly move the odds very significantly in your favor.

::

And since it's not that hard to do, why not you just need?

::

Some right?

::

A little bit of training and education and you can do it so.

::

I I'm getting ready probably beginning of June to launch.

::

I think this will be my fourth group that I'll take through.

::

I have room for up to 12.

::

People you can post my e-mail if you want the best way is that people just e-mail me and I'll respond pretty quickly and just share the basic details.

::

Are you interested in prevention?

::

Do you have a current diagnosis?

::

What are you looking for?

::

And basically for legal reasons?

::

I work as a health and Wellness coach.

::

If I worked under a standard medical license, I couldn't recommend or do the things I do.

::

If you're an oncologist in the United States working, you know, under a conventional medical license and you recommend.

::

Something in place of chemotherapy that's outside of their very narrow what they call the standard of care.

::

You'll be disbarred.

::

It was your license.

::

Yeah, yeah. You lose your license immediately and there's no appeal to it. You're done. So there you are. You've still got $300,000 in student debt to get the.

::

Foreign license and now you can't even practice. So that's why most oncologists won't do it. That's one rational answer for why 73% of oncologists wouldn't use chemotherapy for themselves and they still recommend it.

::

There are other reasons there's some economic reasons that are absolutely shocking, and we probably don't have time, but best way is e-mail.

::

My phone number will be posted wherever this gets hosted.

::

I believe.

::

Feel free to call me.

::

Leave me a message.

::

I'm pretty busy and I I have some people.

::

Elaborate and help me, but I still do get overwhelmed. It could take 24 hours for me to get back to you, but I'm pretty good in anybody who sincerely is interested in finding out what their options are. I will offer them a free consultation, get them pointed in the right.

::

No obligation for that.

::

You know, I want people to do what they believe is for their highest good.

::

If somebody is gonna take advantage of my services, I work for them.

::

They don't work for me.

::

They're in charge.

::

So you could think of it as a good size sailboat on the navigator.

::

They're the captain and the boat owner.

::

And that's the way I like to.

::

Work so.

::

That sounds perfect.

::

So we'll in that 90 minute session, which is about how long in fact I'm going to do one as soon as we're done here with somebody who's newly diagnosed with some breast cancer, we'll explore what the options are, what the different variables are.

::

I'll ask enough really good questions so that I have as complete a picture.

::

I may ask them to submit some lab work to me if they have scans.

::

I want to look at those.

::

I want to gather as much information as I can and then I'll be able to get them pointed in the right direction if they want someone to be their navigator and maybe even their helmsman to steer the boat under their command.

::

Of course, to get them from chaos and fear to.

::

Clarity and calm from.

::

Dealing with cancer, to being cancer free, I'm happy to fulfill that and that's really the heart of my work besides the research.

::

Well, thank you so much.

::

For sharing everything that you've shared with us, this has been.

::

Just a phenomenal conversation in terms of getting, getting some clarity on some of the things that I was really wondering about, especially when it comes to like the blood glucose and ketones and stuff, so.

::

Thank you Jeff, for being.

::

Part of the The You World Order Showcase program.

::

My honor, and thank you for having me.

::

Do we have time for one more?

::

Ohh wait.

::

OK.

::

So the other thing is most tumor forming, cancers are hormone responsive regardless of whether they're.

::

Triple negative, triple positive.

::

The hell with all that.

::

Just assume if you've got a tumor somewhere in the body and I don't care if it's in your big toe or in the back of your head.

::

It's hormone responsive and what you don't want is estrogen dominance.

::

So if you have a diagnosis or if you're at high risk.

::

Get saliva testing, which is the only accurate way to do it.

::

To find out what your basic hormone panel looks like and you're looking at estrogen, you're looking at progesterone.

::

You're looking at testosterone and the precursor DHEA.

::

Get somebody who knows what they're doing.

::

I do this.

::

For my clients all the time I've been doing it for 35 years. The saliva stuff I was trained by one of the people who helped invent that whole technology, who now runs ZRT Labs. His name is David Zava and the other person who trained me was Doctor J.

::

On Lee.

::

But anyway, get that done.

::

Get that progesterone to estrogen ratio optimal and that.

::

Tells cancer cells not to divide so frequently and tells them not to create, and tells the body not to let them create their own blood supply, which is called angiogenesis.

::

So that's another real big key and it's so important.

::

I couldn't leave it out.

::

Well, I really appreciate you sharing that with us and I honestly from the bottom of my heart, thank you so much.

::

It's just been very fascinating for me and I'm sure my listeners will agree, this is you shared some very useful, helpful information.

::

So thanks again.

::

Thank you very much.

::

It's been an honor and a pleasure, and there's much more to share.

::

So let's do this again.

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About the Podcast

The You World Order Showcase Podcast
changing the world with one coach at a time.
Featuring life, health & transformation coaches being the change they want to see in the world! Listen in as they share what they are doing to make the world a better, kinder and more sustainable place for us all as they navigate the journey between coach and entrepreneur. And share their expertise to make your life better in the process.

Jill Hart - The Coach's Alchemist &
Host, You World Order Showcase Podcast
Contact: https://hartlifecoach.com
Join our community: https://facebook.com/groups/theyouworldorder
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Jill Hart

The Coach's Alchemist & host of the You World Order Showcase Podcast is dedicated to empowering life, health and transformational coaches being the change they want to see in the world. Join our private community, where you will find support, networking & collaboration, get featured on our podcast and we also provide coaching to help you find clients with podcasts. It all starts with joining our community! (it's free)
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